Showing posts tagged terrorism
(Reblogged from climateadaptation)

Extrajudicial Executions are Executions Too

kohenari:

In so many of my recent posts, I’ve written about my long-standing concern about the excitement that Americans feel about our use of the death penalty. The most obvious example, of course, was the GOP debate audience cheering at the mention of the hundreds of executions presided over by Rick Perry in Texas. With the news today of the death of Anwar al-Awlaki in Yemen, there’s another round of triumphalism at the reach of the mighty arm of the United States, but this time it’s not only from supporters of executions.

I’ve been encouraged by the number of people who have taken note of the problem of the death penalty in the past few weeks and who have begun to ask whether or not the government ought to be in the business of killings its own citizens. Perhaps, for the first time, the fact that a presidential candidate has an unshakable faith in the death penalty’s infallibility will prove a detriment rather than a virtue, in no small part due to the many questions that people raised (and continue to raise) regarding Troy Davis’ and Cameron Todd Willingham’s guilt. The trials of these men, so many have now claimed, were tainted by bad evidence. 

But if you thought there was a problem with the evidence presented in those trials, you’re really going to have a problem with the evidence presented in the trial against al-Awlaki, who was assassinated in Yemen today …  because there was no trial. While there might be a great deal of evidence against Awlaki, none of it was presented in a court of law and, with his death, there’s no reason to believe that it ever will be. While Americans cherish the idea of having our day in court, it seems that we’re pretty quick to dismiss that right when it comes to a group of people who aren’t like us and who don’t like us.

The real trouble, though, is that a lot of liberals will now say that there is a categorical difference between the assassination of Anwar al-Awlaki and the executions I oppose. They’ll make the case that Awlaki was killed as part of America’s ongoing war against its terrorist enemies and that, because he was declared some sort of enemy combatant, this targeted killing is a legitimate use of the power of the state.

But make no mistake: this is an extrajudicial execution of an American citizen and, regardless of how we feel about Awlaki, we ought to be deeply distressed by it. If we’re not, then we’re simply allowing ourselves to be fooled by the rhetoric of our government.

Ultimately, this is what the declaration of a war on terrorism has wrought; this is why words matter.

because there was no trial

To participate in this kind of extrajudicial killing seems to me, to admit defeat.

(Reblogged from kohenari)

Ten Years Isn’t Enough

kohenari:

Earlier today, my friend Steve Smith posted the following on his Facebook page:

Ten years isn’t enough to see clearly how the attacks have truly changed us. I guess I’d describe it as a lost decade: We’re poorer and less free, our culture is more shallow, our politics are meaner and more paranoid, and most of us are stunningly indifferent to shared sacrifice. Lawrence Wright once said “al Qaeda can’t destroy America. Only we can do that to ourselves.” I hope and pray that a decade from now, we can reflect on that day from a very different vantage point.

I think he captures quite nicely the way I’ve been feeling for the past week or so. Indeed, I wasn’t planning to write anything at all today. But as the memorials and testimonials began piling up all over the internet, it really struck me that the best we can do is to tell people where we were, what we saw, and how we felt ten years ago. Or else we can saddle the memory of the people who lost their lives with the baggage of everything that came afterward. A whole lot of people have chosen one or the other of these options, or both. But neither one appeals to me in the least, and so I post Steve’s thoughts on this anniversary and I hope, along with him, that another decade will provide us all with some real perspective.

(Reblogged from abbyjean)
depressingfacts:

Delayed-notice search warrants issued under the expanded powers of the Patriot Act, 2006–2009.  
[source]

depressingfacts:

Delayed-notice search warrants issued under the expanded powers of the Patriot Act, 2006–2009.  

[source]

(Reblogged from manicchill)
The FBI has built a massive network of spies to prevent another domestic terrorist attack. But are they busting plots—or leading them? That’s the question addressed by a year-long investigation in Mother Jones magazine. It suggests FBI informants are not only busting terrorist plots, they are actually leading them so the FBI can later claim victories in the so-called “war on terror.”
(Reblogged from diadoumenos)
(Reblogged from pieceinthepuzzlehumanity-deacti)
(Reblogged from pieceinthepuzzlehumanity-deacti)
(Reblogged from pieceinthepuzzlehumanity-deacti)
(Reblogged from sarahlee310)
secrets0ciety:

Cuba Protests New U.S. Air Security Measures
Cuba signaled its growing anger with the United States on Tuesday by calling in the top U.S. diplomat on the island to protest its inclusion on a list of countries whose U.S.-bound air passengers must get extra security screening.
In a statement, the Cuban government said it had delivered a note of protest calling the new measures a “politically motivated” ploy to justify the United States’ 47-year-old trade embargo against the communist island. On Monday, the measures were denounced in Cuba’s state-run press as “anti-terrorist paranoia.”

Guess I am not the only one wondering.

secrets0ciety:

Cuba Protests New U.S. Air Security Measures

Cuba signaled its growing anger with the United States on Tuesday by calling in the top U.S. diplomat on the island to protest its inclusion on a list of countries whose U.S.-bound air passengers must get extra security screening.

In a statement, the Cuban government said it had delivered a note of protest calling the new measures a “politically motivated” ploy to justify the United States’ 47-year-old trade embargo against the communist island. On Monday, the measures were denounced in Cuba’s state-run press as “anti-terrorist paranoia.”

Guess I am not the only one wondering.