Showing posts tagged keystone xl

Dear Friends— I’m writing this from the lawn in front of the White House.

leftish:

In front of me there’s a sprawling rally underway, with speakers ranging from indigenous elders to the great Canadian writer Naomi Klein. In back of me, another 243 courageous people are being hauled away to jail — it’s the last day of Phase 1 of the tar sands campaign, and 1,252 North Americans have been arrested, the biggest civil disobedience action this century on this continent.

But we’ve been just as cheered by the help that has poured in from around the world — today, activists in front of the White House held a banner with a huge number on it: 618,428. That’s how many people around the world who signed on to the “Stop the Tar Sands” mega-petition to President Obama, including many of you in the 350.org network. Check out this beautiful photo of passion and courage on display:

(Photo Credit: Josh Lopez. If you can’t see the photo above, click here to see it and more inspirational photos from DC.)

But this movement does more than sign petitions: many of you stood strong in front of the White House risking arrest, and protesters on every continent have picketed outside embassies and consulates. That makes sense, for global warming is the one problem that affects everyone everywhere.

And the next moment to prove that is Sept. 24 for Moving Planet — the massive day of climate action that will unite people all over the world. We’ve heard news of amazing actions from every corner of the earth -— from a massive bike rally in the Philippines to an incredible eco-festival in Philadelphia. I truly can’t wait to see the pictures pour in.

But here’s why it’s important: we’re not just a movement that opposes things, we’re also a movement that dreams of what’s coming. And we don’t just dream, we also transform those dreams into reality. On September 24, on bike and on foot and on boards, we’re going to point the way towards that future. By days’ end, we’ll have shown why the bicycle is more glamorous than the car, and why the people have the potential to be more powerful than the polluters. 

On some days fighting global warming means swallowing hard, mustering your courage, and making a sacrifice — other days it means getting all your friends up in the saddles of their bikes to have some fun and help move the planet forward.

September 24 is the second kind of day; it’s going to be powerful, it’s going to be beautiful, and I can’t wait to see how it turns out.  Please find or join a local event to get involved. 

Onwards,

Bill McKibben for the whole 350.org team

(Reblogged from leftish)
(Reblogged from abcsoupdot)

blissandzen:

other-stuff:

inothernews:

newshour:

A map of the proposed Keystone XL, also called Tar Sands, pipeline.

It could carry crude oil some 1,700 miles from Alberta, Canada, to the Gulf Coast in Texas.

A friendly and safe new source of oil for the U.S. or an environmental disaster waiting to happen?

A pipeline that’s 36 inches in diameter, less than half-an-inch thick?

Environmental disaster waiting to fucking happen.

Don’t forget the damn thing is carrying corrosive bitumen rich oil over the Ogallala aquifer that provides irrigation for something like 20% of our irrigated farm land, worse yet the Nebraska portion of the aquifer (where the pipeline crosses) is one the few areas of the aquifer that is being replenished faster than it is being used. So water in that area is feeding the aquifer.

News flash, folks. There are two pipelines that size, built the same way, from Houston to New Jersey, via Atlanta, Spartanburg, Greensboro, and Richmond, with a branch line to Nashville via Chattanooga, carrying refinery products under high pressure already. One’s been in the ground since the early 60s, the other since the late 70s, running 24/7/365. Standard wall thickness on the line pipe is .318 inches, and there’s a weld every 40 feet, max. They bump it up to a full inch and pour concrete around it for road and river crossings. Their safety record is not quite exemplary, but it’s pretty good.

The Alberta tar sands oil is more caustic than most piped oil (produces substantially more C02 to produce and consumes most of Canada’s natural gas to process) and the part of this pipeline that has been completed — not the XL part — is only one year old and has had 12 leaks. I believe the biggest two were due to faulty valves but the cause of at least some of the other leaks is as yet unknown. Something like 60% of Nebraska’s wells are within 10 miles of the pipeline — a bad spill could be devastating.

edit — correction “64 percent of the groundwater wells are within one mile of the Keystone XL route.”

(Reblogged from blissandzen)

inothernews:

newshour:

A map of the proposed Keystone XL, also called Tar Sands, pipeline.

It could carry crude oil some 1,700 miles from Alberta, Canada, to the Gulf Coast in Texas.

A friendly and safe new source of oil for the U.S. or an environmental disaster waiting to happen?

A pipeline that’s 36 inches in diameter, less than half-an-inch thick?

Environmental disaster waiting to fucking happen.

Don’t forget the damn thing is carrying corrosive bitumen rich oil over the Ogallala aquifer that provides irrigation for something like 20% of our irrigated farm land, worse yet the Nebraska portion of the aquifer (where the pipeline crosses) is one the few areas of the aquifer that is being replenished faster than it is being used. So water in that area is feeding the aquifer.

(Reblogged from inothernews)
(Reblogged from pieceinthepuzzlehumanity-deacti)

Dozens arrested outside White House in Keystone pipeline protests

They’re staging the protest as the U.S. State Department is poised to release its final environmental assessment of TransCanada’s US$7 billion project. That report is expected within days, and Obama will then have 90 days to decide whether granting the Calgary-based oil giant a pipeline permit is in the U.S. national interest.

Keystone XL will carry millions of barrels of oilsands crude a week from northern Alberta through the American heartland to Gulf Coast refineries.

Environmentalists say the Keystone XL has the potential to wreak havoc on America’s agricultural heartland and point to recent large-scale pipeline oil spills. Proponents of the pipeline, including most congressional Republicans, consider the project a major job creator that will help end American reliance on Middle East oil.

The U.S. State Department is tasked with making a decision on the pipeline because it crosses an international border. In recent talks in Washington between Hillary Clinton and Foreign Affairs Minister John Baird, the secretary of state was exceedingly cautious when discussing the pipeline, says a source familiar with the discussion.

This planned pipeline would carry dirty caustic oil through the Ogallala Aquifer, one of our largest and most important aquifers — it provides water for the middle third of the country and is vital to agriculture. An oil leak could be devastating to our agricultural production.

Write a note to the president telling him the pipeline is not in our national interest.

kateoplis:

Add 50 more to the 70 arrested yesterday at the Tar-Sands Pipeline Protest in front of White House. The group said this pipeline is the most important environmental decision of Obama’s presidency. They will continue to protest for the next two weeks. More here and here.

Photo: Vermont environmental author & activist Bill McKibben

(Reblogged from pieceinthepuzzlehumanity-deacti)

By Robert Kunzig Photograph by Peter Essick

Scraping Bottom

Once considered too expensive, as well as too damaging to the land, exploitation of Alberta’s oil sands is now a gamble worth billions.

Nowhere on Earth is more earth being moved these days than in the Athabasca Valley. To extract each barrel of oil from a surface mine, the industry must first cut down the forest, then remove an average of two tons of peat and dirt that lie above the oil sands layer, then two tons of the sand itself. It must heat several barrels of water to strip the bitumen from the sand and upgrade it, and afterward it discharges contaminated water into tailings ponds like the one near Mildred Lake. They now cover around 50 square miles. Last April some 500 migrating ducks mistook one of those ponds, at a newer Syncrude mine north of Fort McKay, for a hospitable stopover, landed on its oily surface, and died.