Showing posts tagged jobs

quickhits:

Romney’s ‘Steel Skeleton in the Bain Closet.’

Steve Benen:

We talked yesterday about Mitt Romney’s Bain Capital and the millions it made while crushing a Missouri steel company called GS Technologies. Reuters called the fiasco the “steel skeleton in the Bain closet.”

MoveOn.org has a new video highlighting some of Romney’s victims. One is Donny Box, whom we met on Thursday, and the other is Glen Patrick Wells, who spent a generation at the Kansas City steel mill Romney helped shut down.

“I spent 34 years in this steel mill,” Wells tells viewers. “They walked out of here with millions. They left us with nothing.”

What’s especially noteworthy about Wells is his political background. Greg Sargent talked to him yesterday and found that Wells is a self-identified conservative who voted for Bush and McCain. He’s so disgusted with Romney, though, that he’s willing to work with MoveOn.org.

Mitt’s problem is that he is what the GOP calls a “job creator.” And he illustrates just what a steaming pile of bullshit that term is. When Romney and his defenders talk about his Bain years, they like to use the term “creative destruction” — i.e., you can’t make an omelet without breaking a few eggs. The problem with this defense is that the destruction outweighs the creation by a huge factor. Firms like Bain have so few employees that they can legitimately qualify as small businesses. A steel mill is not a small business. This was literally a sacrifice of many for the benefit of a few.

(Reblogged from randomactsofchaos)
(Reblogged from diadoumenos)
(Reblogged from sarahlee310)

President Obama has made a variety of claims about the American Jobs Act, most notably the fact that the bill would boost the economy — and be fully paid for. How do those claims stand up to scrutiny? According to the non-partisan CBO, pretty well

All told, the American Jobs Bill, the CBO concluded, would reduce the deficit by $3 billion over the next 10 years, and that doesn’t factor in potential savings associated with increased revenue from a healthier economy.

The CBO’s findings don’t come as a big surprise — Democrats tend to take arithmetic seriously when crafting legislation — but they leave Republicans with no excuses for failure. The bill that’s on the table, as objective matter, creates jobs, cuts taxes, is fully paid for, and reduces the deficit.

(Reblogged from sarahlee310)

randomactsofchaos:

Matt Wuerker/Politico (10/5/2011)

(Reblogged from randomactsofchaos)
timetruthhumor:

It’s hard enough to be unemployed — but there’s a growing problem with companies that refuse to hire people who don’t already have a job. With unemployment at 9%, this kind of discrimination affects a huge number of people. And it hits Black communities particularly hard — more than 15% of African Americans are unemployed.[1]
60,000 people signed a petition asking job listing websites like Monster.com to ban ads that discriminate against the unemployed.[2] But not only did Monster.com refuse to ban these ads — they actually threatened legal action against the creators of the petition3 Other job listing websites have been completely silent. It’s outrageous.
Monster.com needs to hear our voices now. Please join me in calling on Monster.com and other job listing websites to stop publishing ads which discriminate against the unemployed. It takes just a moment:
http://act.colorofchange.org/sign/monster?referring_akid=a10797097.902456.GunH0B&source=copy_thanks_email
At a time when more than 9% of Americans are out of work, during the worst economic downturn since the Great Depression, no one should have to have a job in order to get a job. This type of discrimination hurts everyone who’s looking for work. But Black people are nearly twice as likely to be unemployed as White folks. And Latinos are also unemployed at a higher rate than Whites.[4]Whether it’s intended or not, discrimination against the unemployed is discrimination against Black and Latino Americans.
Democrats in the House and Senate are crafting legislation that would make this kind of discrimination illegal. But right now, without any law to prevent discrimination against the unemployed, job listing websites could do more than anyone else to stop this practice. These companies are supposed to be in the business of helping people find jobs. But by continuing to publish help wanted ads that say “you must be currently employed to apply,” they’re enabling a practice which makes it even harder to recover for the people who are struggling the hardest in this economy.
Monster.com has said that they’re against discrimination against the unemployed[5] — but they’re refusing to stop publishing these ads, saying that they’ll leave it up to individual companies to decide what to do.[6]Monster.com wants to have it both ways — they think they can pay lip service to opposing this practice, while continuing to make money off of the companies that engage in it. It’s selfish and irresponsible.
We can help by joining the more than 60,000 people who have already called for Monster.com and other job listing sites to stop discrimination against the unemployed. If enough of us speak out, we can create negative media attention that will make easier for Monster.com to do the right thing than to continue profiting from job listings that discriminate.
Please join me in demanding that Monster.com and other job listing companies stop publishing ads that discriminate against the unemployed:
http://act.colorofchange.org/sign/monster?referring_akid=a10797097.902456.GunH0B&source=copy_thanks_email
Thanks.

timetruthhumor:

It’s hard enough to be unemployed — but there’s a growing problem with companies that refuse to hire people who don’t already have a job. With unemployment at 9%, this kind of discrimination affects a huge number of people. And it hits Black communities particularly hard — more than 15% of African Americans are unemployed.[1]

60,000 people signed a petition asking job listing websites like Monster.com to ban ads that discriminate against the unemployed.[2] But not only did Monster.com refuse to ban these ads — they actually threatened legal action against the creators of the petition3 Other job listing websites have been completely silent. It’s outrageous.

Monster.com needs to hear our voices now. Please join me in calling on Monster.com and other job listing websites to stop publishing ads which discriminate against the unemployed. It takes just a moment:

http://act.colorofchange.org/sign/monster?referring_akid=a10797097.902456.GunH0B&source=copy_thanks_email

At a time when more than 9% of Americans are out of work, during the worst economic downturn since the Great Depression, no one should have to have a job in order to get a job. This type of discrimination hurts everyone who’s looking for work. But Black people are nearly twice as likely to be unemployed as White folks. And Latinos are also unemployed at a higher rate than Whites.[4]Whether it’s intended or not, discrimination against the unemployed is discrimination against Black and Latino Americans.

Democrats in the House and Senate are crafting legislation that would make this kind of discrimination illegal. But right now, without any law to prevent discrimination against the unemployed, job listing websites could do more than anyone else to stop this practice. These companies are supposed to be in the business of helping people find jobs. But by continuing to publish help wanted ads that say “you must be currently employed to apply,” they’re enabling a practice which makes it even harder to recover for the people who are struggling the hardest in this economy.

Monster.com has said that they’re against discrimination against the unemployed[5] — but they’re refusing to stop publishing these ads, saying that they’ll leave it up to individual companies to decide what to do.[6]Monster.com wants to have it both ways — they think they can pay lip service to opposing this practice, while continuing to make money off of the companies that engage in it. It’s selfish and irresponsible.

We can help by joining the more than 60,000 people who have already called for Monster.com and other job listing sites to stop discrimination against the unemployed. If enough of us speak out, we can create negative media attention that will make easier for Monster.com to do the right thing than to continue profiting from job listings that discriminate.

Please join me in demanding that Monster.com and other job listing companies stop publishing ads that discriminate against the unemployed:

http://act.colorofchange.org/sign/monster?referring_akid=a10797097.902456.GunH0B&source=copy_thanks_email

Thanks.

(Reblogged from diadoumenos)

pantslessprogressive:

Our jobs crisis, visualized. Police officers line up and salute outside Trenton, New Jersey’s police headquarters on Friday, September 16. Below: Jose Medina, a 20-year veteran of the police force, hugs his daughter, who was laid off.

The men and women you see here - more than 100 - were laid off by the city today due to deep spending cuts.

[Photo: Mel Evans/AP]

(Reblogged from pantslessprogressive)
ryking:

Paul Krugman, “The Death of the Confidence Fairy.” Shorter Krugman: Austerity measures make the economic situation worse, not better.

ryking:

Paul Krugman, “The Death of the Confidence Fairy.” Shorter Krugman: Austerity measures make the economic situation worse, not better.

(Reblogged from diadoumenos)

Republican Doublespeak

liberalsarecool:

Two sentence from House Speaker John Boehner’s jobs speech today:

“If we want to create a better environment for job creation, politicians of all stripes can leave the ‘my way or the highway’ philosophy behind.”

“Tax increases, however, are not a viable option for the Joint Committee.”

The Orange Man likes to say one thing, and do the exact opposite. Complete nonsense. Not interested in America, only his party.

(Source: politicalwire.com)

(Reblogged from sarahlee310)

sscd:

leftliberty:

Congressional Progressive Caucus Presents Jobs Plan

Following up on speak outs it organized around the country during the summer  the Congressional Progressive Caucus Sept. 13 unveiled a far-reaching Rebuild the American Dream Framework, focusing on six areas for immediate and long-term job creation.

Calling the jobs proposal President Obama presented to the country last week “comprehensive,” and “a wonderful first step,” CPC co-chair Rep. Raul Grijalva, D-Ariz., told a Washington DC press conference, “We’d like to make it bigger.”Rep. Barbara Lee, D-Calif., told reporters,“It was so important to get out of Washington DC, and to participate with people, to listen to the stories so many people have told us, and to bring back their ideas and their thoughts about what we need to do next.”

The CPC’s Framework focuses on six areas:

  •  Make it in America Again: Develop a national plan for manufacturing, to reopen U.S. factories.
  •  Rebuild America: A national investment bank to rebuild roads, bridges, locks and dams, connect and empower the country with fiber optic cable.
  • Jobs for the Next Generation: Make “the guarantee of a good American job real for every young person,” through “direct employment in the public sector and incentives for hiring in the non-profit sector and private sector.” Provide stipends to workers and youth in job training programs.

Read more

Now it’s our time to make sure it gets passed! Call! Write letters! Hold rallies and speeches! Let people know that there is a plan to help the working class.

DEMAND THE GOVERNMENT SERVE YOU

(Reblogged from pieceinthepuzzlehumanity-deacti)

govtoversight:

The U.S. government’s increasing reliance on contractors to do work traditionally done by federal employees is fueled by the belief that private industry can deliver services at a lower cost than in-house staff.

But a first-of-its-kind study released today by the Project On Government Oversight (POGO) busts that myth by showing that using contractors to perform services actually increases costs to taxpayers.

Exactly how much is that cost increase? Go find out.

—-

“This is absolutely something taxpayers should be worried about. The government needs to be very careful about outsourcing work, especially work that is inherently governmental. It also costs so much more to privately contract,” says Janine Wedel, a professor at George Mason University who specializes in the privatization of public policy and corruption.

POGO has expressed concern that the federal government routinely enters long-term contracts—as long as 10 years in some cases. The POGO report points to a 2009 Federal Times article where 16 intelligence agencies urged Congress to remove caps on staffing at intelligence agencies. Because of these federal employee ceilings, the agencies had no choice but to hire contractors as semi-permanent staff, which most likely results in a higher bill for taxpayers.

I suspect in other sorts of jobs where the contractor is for example a janitorial service, the contractor’s employees may earn less than the government workers had, but that the cost may be hardly any different because of course, the contracting company is in it for a profit.

(Reblogged from dendroica)
(Reblogged from sarahlee310)