Showing posts tagged energy

stoweboyd:

climateadaptation:

Urban Renewal

These 10 global infrastructure and tech companies are among the early leaders in smart-city programs.

“Like Siemens and ABB, most of the beneficiaries of urbanization will be infrastructure and technology outfits that provide or utilize smartphones, sensors and software and services to track the use of a city’s assets and commit resources when and where they’re needed. Cloud technology, which can cut costs while boosting computing capacity, will play a big role. Even social media will participate, as cities multiply the ways a citizen can spot a problem–anything from a water-main break to a traffic snarl–and then alert others to avoid it or do something about it.

Technology researchers at IDC estimate the size of the smart-city information-technology market is now $34 billion annually and will gain 18%-plus a year to $57 billion by 2014. That’s not a huge amount to global giants, but certainly enough to help drive growth. (The companies don’t break out earnings related to these projects.) The market has broadened to include items like broadband connectivity, green belts, renewable energy, green buildings and other intelligent-city systems. “You are talking about smart water, smart transportation, better public safety,” says Jennifer Bélissent, a consultant at Forrester.”

Source: Barron’s “Dawn of the Smart City”

(Reblogged from soupsoup)

benvironment:

How do you fancy these as alternatives to the traditional electricity pylons currently criss-crossing the landscape?  They’re one of six designs that made the shortlist of suitable replacements for the UK’s 88,000 pylons.

The UK apparently needs an upgrade of its transmission infrastructure, so the Royal Institute of British Architects, the Department of Energy & Climate Change and the National Grid appealed to various designers for options that balanced energy needs and visual impact.

You can see all six pylon designs on the Guardian website.

I’m honestly not sure what I think of them.  They all seem radically different to our iconic grey pylons and I have difficulty picturing any of them marching across my neck of the woods…….although, there must be a reason I picked this particular photo rather than any of the others?  Most likely the beautiful blue sky…..which has been in short supply this summer.

(Reblogged from benvironment)

The Nobel Peace Laureates’ letter to President Obama - in full

benvironment:

Keystone pipeline

I’ve reproduced the Nobel Peace Laureates’ letter to President Obama in full in case you want to read it.  It’s not very long actually and is worth reading, as it sums up the Keystone situation quite well.

I’m sure this isn’t the kind of publicity the President wants at the moment…..

 September 7, 2011

Dear President Obama,

We — a group of Nobel Peace Laureates — are writing today to ask you to do the right thing for our environment and reject the proposal to build the Keystone XL, a 1700-mile pipeline that would stretch from Canada’s Alberta tar sands to the Texas Gulf Coast.

It is your decision to make.

The night you were nominated for president, you told the world that under your leadership — and working together — the rise of the oceans will begin to slow and the planet will begin to heal. You spoke of creating a clean energy economy. This is a critical moment to make good on that pledge, and make a lasting contribution to the health and well being of everyone of this planet.

In asking you to make this decision, we recognize the more than 1200 Americans who risked arrest to protest in front of the White House between August 20th and September 3rd. These brave individuals have spoken movingly about experiencing the power of nonviolence in facing authority. They represent millions of people whose lives and livelihoods will be affected by construction and operation of the pipeline in Alberta, Montana, South Dakota, Nebraska, Kansas, Oklahoma and Texas.

All along its prospective route, the pipeline endangers farms, wildlife and precious water aquifers — including the Ogallala Aquifer, the US’ main source of freshwater for America’s heartland. We are aware that Nebraska’s Governor Dave Heineman — as well as two Nebraska Senators — has urged you to reconsider the pathway of the pipeline. In his letter to you he clearly stated his concern about the threat to this crucial water source for Nebraska’s farmers and ranchers. The aquifer supplies drinking water to two million people in Nebraska and seven other states.

We know that another pipeline that covers some of the same route as the proposed pipeline, and built by the same company proposing to build Keystone XL, already leaked 14 times over its first year of operation.

Like you, we understand that strip-mining and drilling tar sands from under Alberta’s Boreal forests and then transporting thousands of barrels of oil a day from Canada through to Texas will not only hurt people in the US — but will also endanger the entire planet. After the oil fields of Saudi Arabia, the full development of the Alberta tar sands will create the world’s second largest potential source of global warming gases. As NASA climatologist James Hansen has said, this is “essentially game over for the climate.”

There is a better way.

Your rejection of the pipeline provides a tremendous opportunity to begin transition away from our dependence on oil, coal and gas and instead increase investments in renewable energies and energy efficiency.

We urge you to say ‘no’ to the plan proposed by the Canadian-based company TransCanada to build the Keystone XL, and to turn your attention back to supporting renewable sources of energy and clean transportation solutions. This will be your legacy to Americans and the global community: energy that sustains the lives and livelihoods of future generations.

Sincerely,

Mairead Maguire, Nobel Peace Laureate (1976) - Ireland

Betty Williams, Nobel Peace Laureate (1976) - Ireland

Adolfo Pérez Esquivel, Nobel Peace Laureate (1980) - Argentina

Archbishop Desmond Tutu, Nobel Peace Laureate (1984) - South Africa

His Holiness the 14th Dalai Lama, Nobel Peace Laureate (1989) - Tibet

Rigoberta Menchú Tum, Nobel Peace Laureate (1992) - Guatemala

José Ramos-Horta, Nobel Peace Laureate (1996) - East Timor

Jody Williams, Nobel Peace Laureate (1997) - USA

Shirin Ebadi, Nobel Peace Laureate (2003) - Iran

See the most recent stories about the Keystone Pipeline.

(Source: The Huffington Post)

(Reblogged from pieceinthepuzzlehumanity-deacti)
(Reblogged from oregon-stuff)
(Reblogged from sarahlee310)
(Reblogged from abcsoupdot)

mothernaturenetwork:

Japanese breakthrough will make wind power cheaper than nuclear
A surprising aerodynamic innovation in wind turbine design called the ‘wind lens’ could triple the output of a typical wind turbine, making it less costly than nuclear power.

(Reblogged from pieceinthepuzzlehumanity-deacti)
(Reblogged from abcsoupdot)
abcsoupdot:

wearetheearth:

electricpower:

Half Of Morocco Will Be Solar-Powered By 2020 - 
 
Apparently Morocco gets 3,000 hours of reliable sun power a year, so it’s not surprising the government is building five solar power plants in the next decade, which will generate 40 per cent of the country’s electricity.
Just 2 Gigawatts of solar power will be enough for almost half of the 32 million people living in Morocco, with the project costs running into $9 billion.
[Alternative Energy News viaCleanTechnica via GreenLaunches]
Image Credit: Milamber
Gizmodo

abcsoupdot:

wearetheearth:

electricpower:

Half Of Morocco Will Be Solar-Powered By 2020 -

Apparently Morocco gets 3,000 hours of reliable sun power a year, so it’s not surprising the government is building five solar power plants in the next decade, which will generate 40 per cent of the country’s electricity.

Just 2 Gigawatts of solar power will be enough for almost half of the 32 million people living in Morocco, with the project costs running into $9 billion.

[Alternative Energy News viaCleanTechnica via GreenLaunches]

Image Credit: Milamber

Gizmodo

(Reblogged from abcsoupdot)