Showing posts tagged criminal justice
(Reblogged from kohenari)
(Reblogged from letterstomycountry)

motherjones:

When two Austin filmmakers set out to chronicle the flawed forensics behind the 2004 execution of Cameron Todd Willingham, they found themselves in the middle of a pitched political battle, pitting criminal justice activists against the a Texas governor (Rick Perry) looking to sweep news of a wrongful execution under the rug. Joe Bailey and Steve Mims chat with MoJo about their new documentary, Incendiary.

(Reblogged from sarahlee310)

Extrajudicial Executions are Executions Too

kohenari:

In so many of my recent posts, I’ve written about my long-standing concern about the excitement that Americans feel about our use of the death penalty. The most obvious example, of course, was the GOP debate audience cheering at the mention of the hundreds of executions presided over by Rick Perry in Texas. With the news today of the death of Anwar al-Awlaki in Yemen, there’s another round of triumphalism at the reach of the mighty arm of the United States, but this time it’s not only from supporters of executions.

I’ve been encouraged by the number of people who have taken note of the problem of the death penalty in the past few weeks and who have begun to ask whether or not the government ought to be in the business of killings its own citizens. Perhaps, for the first time, the fact that a presidential candidate has an unshakable faith in the death penalty’s infallibility will prove a detriment rather than a virtue, in no small part due to the many questions that people raised (and continue to raise) regarding Troy Davis’ and Cameron Todd Willingham’s guilt. The trials of these men, so many have now claimed, were tainted by bad evidence. 

But if you thought there was a problem with the evidence presented in those trials, you’re really going to have a problem with the evidence presented in the trial against al-Awlaki, who was assassinated in Yemen today …  because there was no trial. While there might be a great deal of evidence against Awlaki, none of it was presented in a court of law and, with his death, there’s no reason to believe that it ever will be. While Americans cherish the idea of having our day in court, it seems that we’re pretty quick to dismiss that right when it comes to a group of people who aren’t like us and who don’t like us.

The real trouble, though, is that a lot of liberals will now say that there is a categorical difference between the assassination of Anwar al-Awlaki and the executions I oppose. They’ll make the case that Awlaki was killed as part of America’s ongoing war against its terrorist enemies and that, because he was declared some sort of enemy combatant, this targeted killing is a legitimate use of the power of the state.

But make no mistake: this is an extrajudicial execution of an American citizen and, regardless of how we feel about Awlaki, we ought to be deeply distressed by it. If we’re not, then we’re simply allowing ourselves to be fooled by the rhetoric of our government.

Ultimately, this is what the declaration of a war on terrorism has wrought; this is why words matter.

because there was no trial

To participate in this kind of extrajudicial killing seems to me, to admit defeat.

(Reblogged from kohenari)
Ballistics evidence used to convict Davis has since been debunked. Another witness has since emerged as a plausible suspect in the murder. Three jurors on the case now say that if they knew then what they know now, they would not have voted to convict. Davis was quite possibly innocent, but that was hardly the point. As expressed by the popular Twitter hash-tag, the problem was quite simply that there was #TooMuchDoubt.
The state of Georgia executed Troy Davis at 11:08 p.m. A few quick thoughts on how it happened, why it matters, and where we go from here. (via motherjones)
(Reblogged from inothernews)

kohenari:

A lot of people have been mobilized by the Troy Davis case, especially in the past few days. You called and emailed elected officials; you petitioned political appointees; you demanded that people be held accountable for a decision that put proper procedure ahead of anything else. But what will all of you do tomorrow? Will you dedicate yourselves to putting an end to the system whose flaws became so apparent to so many tonight? Or will you forget about the continued injustice of the death penalty until the next Troy Davis is moved to the death house? You have many other legitimate concerns in your daily lives and many other important issues that demand your attention. But you cared so much this time; do you think you can continue to care about the brokenness of our justice system as you do right now, tonight?

(Reblogged from kohenari)

kohenari:

It’s sometimes very difficult to imagine that I was born and raised in the same place as people like Ann Coulter. In my humble opinion, it takes a special sort of person to sit down and write something like this, hoping — it seems quite clear — that it will hurt a lot of people.

Shameful, shameful behavior.

A poisonous toad — nothing human about it

(Reblogged from kohenari)
timetruthhumor:

 
7 of 9 Witnesses say my Brother is Innocent. Stop Troy Davis’ Execution on September 21st.
 
WHY THIS IS IMPORTANT
My brother, Troy Davis, has been on Georgia’s death row for 20 years despite strong evidence of his innocence. His execution date is now scheduled for Wed, Sept 21. He has a hearing in front of the GA Board of Pardons & Parole two days beforehand.We need to tell the Board strongly and clearly: There’s too much doubt to execute Troy Davis!
The case against my brother Troy consisted entirely of witness testimony which contained inconsistencies even at the time of the trial. Since then, seven out of nine witnesses from the trial have recanted or contradicted their testimony.
Many of these witnesses have stated in sworn affidavits that they were pressured or coerced by police into testifying or signing statements against Troy Davis. Here is what one had to say:
“I got tired of them harassing me, and they made it clear that the only way they would leave me alone is if I told them what they wanted to hear. I told them that Troy told me he did it, but it wasn’t true.”
We need to tell the Board strongly and clearly: There’s too much doubt to execute Troy Davis!
———————————
http://www.change.org/petitions/7-of-9-witnesses-say-my-brother-is-innocent-stop-troy-davis-execution-on-sep-21

timetruthhumor:

7 of 9 Witnesses say my Brother is Innocent. Stop Troy Davis’ Execution on September 21st.

WHY THIS IS IMPORTANT

My brother, Troy Davis, has been on Georgia’s death row for 20 years despite strong evidence of his innocence. His execution date is now scheduled for Wed, Sept 21. He has a hearing in front of the GA Board of Pardons & Parole two days beforehand.We need to tell the Board strongly and clearly: There’s too much doubt to execute Troy Davis!

The case against my brother Troy consisted entirely of witness testimony which contained inconsistencies even at the time of the trial. Since then, seven out of nine witnesses from the trial have recanted or contradicted their testimony.

Many of these witnesses have stated in sworn affidavits that they were pressured or coerced by police into testifying or signing statements against Troy Davis. Here is what one had to say:

“I got tired of them harassing me, and they made it clear that the only way they would leave me alone is if I told them what they wanted to hear. I told them that Troy told me he did it, but it wasn’t true.”

We need to tell the Board strongly and clearly: There’s too much doubt to execute Troy Davis!

———————————

http://www.change.org/petitions/7-of-9-witnesses-say-my-brother-is-innocent-stop-troy-davis-execution-on-sep-21

(Reblogged from letterstomycountry)
(Reblogged from letterstomycountry)
(Reblogged from letterstomycountry)
(Reblogged from letterstomycountry)
(Reblogged from letterstomycountry)